Collective Unrest

 

Day of the Daisy: A Musical

September 13, 2018

Day of the Daisy: A Musical,” by Margaret Koger is a powerhouse hybrid of poetic edge and unique execution blending journalistic citation into the fray with effortless prowess as it plunges you into its winding narrative. A refreshing example of what the written word can be, and a wonderful swim into the deep of our society.

Click the link below to access the document.

Day of the Daisy: A Musical

 

Margaret Koger lives in Boise, Idaho, USA. A teacher with a writing habit, her poetry has most recently appeared in Mediterranean Poetry, Poetry Breakfast, BLYNKT, Love Askew Anthology, Juke Joint, and The Heartland Review.

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