Collective Unrest

 

Prognosis, Miami

January 30, 2019

*Previously published in Public Pool

A city in flux is no place
to call home. The skyline
is a cloudscape building
to a storm the way it shifts
and grows, expanding into
something that eventually
will fall, give way to blue.

 

Ariel Francisco is the author of All My Heroes Are Broke (C&R Press, 2017). A poet and translator born in the Bronx to Dominican and Guatemalan parents and raised in Miami, his work has appeared or is forthcoming in The Academy of American Poets, The American Poetry Review, Best New Poets 2016, Gulf Coast, and elsewhere. He lives in East New York.

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