Collective Unrest

 

you don’t want to remember

April 10, 2019

TW for sexual assault 

 

you know

by now you know

character traits and character acting

like a fool in love

with yourself you sit

alone lonely grayed voices

call clear and you comeback

why and ask why when

by now you know

you know nothing

as if your mother bottle

fed you groomed you combed

your hair

it’s like this, she said, one hundred strokes

one hundred strikes with a leather belt

both for shininess

welting your thighs you

remember when a man’s hand

touches your thigh backs and takes you

back then back out now

blackout what you know

Amanda Forrester received her MFA from the University of Tampa.  Her poems have appeared in Indolent Books and the Sandhill Review.  She serves on the executive board of YellowJacket Press and snuggles with her fur babies when she isn’t working long hours as a data analyst.  Follow her on Twitter @ajforrester75. This poem originally appeared at Indolent Books’ What Rough Beast, October 2018.

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